Pastors Collecting Tithes Online Are Fraudsters – Shatta Wale

Ghanaian Dancehall musician Charles Nii Armah Mensah Jr., popularly known as Shatta Wale has lashed out at pastors in Ghana who are purportedly collecting tithes and offering online due to ban on church services.

President Akufo-Addo of Ghana in March banned public gatherings including church services in response to the coronavirus outbreak in Ghana.

Some churches immediately introduced online services.

Unconfirmed reports say pastors have been asking their church members to make financial contributions through mobile money and bank transfers.

But Shatta formerly known on stage as Bandana has expressed his disappointment at the act of pastors, stating that at a time the nation is experiencing a disease outbreak, they are engaging in scamming people.

He noted that pastors are supposed to act responsibly in this unprecedented time.

He says the collections made by church members should be used in caring for them, especially the needy.

“We are in a period where pastors shouldn’t try that…your members come to church; they do collection. where’s the collection paid for the past 30-years? As at now that coronavirus is killing your church members, some of your church members do not have cars, houses, they rent and you’re still collecting tithe online. These are scammers. This are hard sakawa guys,” he said.

Meanwhile, the controversial artiste, Shatta Wale has been in the news lately for engaging in a fierce battle with Ghanaian rapper, Sarkodie over his newly released diss track.

Shatta Wale in an interview, explained that the track titled ‘Sub Zero’ is a diss track that attacks other artistes who have at some point in time thrown shades at him (Sarkodie).

He believed the song could have waited till after the country successfully wins the battle against the Coronavirus.

Ghana has recorded some 287 confirmed cases of coronavirus and five deaths according to its health officials.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here